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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 29 Jul 2010 (Thursday) 22:20
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TS-E Learning Curve

 
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Jul 29, 2010 22:20 |  #1

So I finally did it, bought the 24mm L TS-E Mk1 that I've had my eye on for a really long time. So now it's time to learn to use this thing properly.

I've been playing with it, and the first round of pictures that I took, I think, look like total crap. I did take them handheld, so I know that is part of the problem. I was in a hurry on the way home from a jobsite and came across a building that I thought could lend itself to my exploration, so I went for it.

Does anyone have any pointers or places for me to start? I've read many tutorials, but most of them just show me how to make things look like toys, not correct perspective for building applications.

The pictures below averaged about 6 degrees shift with no tilt. I found that that seemed to make this building look the most in perspective. For the handheld application, the most I could get was down was about f/6.7 before having to stabilize with something, even with full sunlight.

I'm open to feedback, pointers, links. Thanks for the help...

IMAGE: http://lh5.ggpht.com/_-Mp8nfBQdjs/TFJDKa-V6AI/AAAAAAAAHDw/erdI0E3islI/s576/IMG_8227.jpg

IMAGE: http://lh3.ggpht.com/_-Mp8nfBQdjs/TFJDKmcW16I/AAAAAAAAHD0/sj2Hfwy_rA0/s576/IMG_8235.jpg

IMAGE: http://lh4.ggpht.com/_-Mp8nfBQdjs/TFJDKvOP2fI/AAAAAAAAHD4/kPsfXqnfUs8/s576/IMG_8237.jpg

IMAGE: http://lh5.ggpht.com/_-Mp8nfBQdjs/TFJDKiLcseI/AAAAAAAAHD8/zqITYl7v4Ko/s576/IMG_8243.jpg

IMAGE: http://lh4.ggpht.com/_-Mp8nfBQdjs/TFJD8HKJQzI/AAAAAAAAHEA/egj1vzeF0-4/s800/tilty%20and%20shifty-3.jpg



  
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Wilt
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Jul 29, 2010 22:26 |  #2

1. Level the camera, then use shifts. Your examples all show vertical line convergence (not parallel to sides of the frame)
2. Meter with shift centered, set on Manual. Do NOT meter with lens shifted, as erroneous metering will result.
3. Use a tripod, even if you have enough light to hand hold the camera, so as to not ruin #1


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Jul 29, 2010 22:31 |  #3

Go here and check out his site. Shift is a piece of cake, he does an awesome job with tilt.
http://www.northlight-images.co.uk …ses/ts-e_24_f35_l_ii.html (external link)


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Architective
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Jul 30, 2010 20:55 as a reply to  @ windpig's post |  #4

Do most people use spirit levels?




  
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The ­ Ran
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Jul 31, 2010 11:40 |  #5

As Wilt said, you must keep the camera level (or parallel to the side of the building). Doing this will no doubt cut off the top of the building and show a lot of the ground, shift the lens up to correct this. Also metering before shifting is important too, just stick the camera on manual and choose your settings until the light meter says the exposure is correct (or however you want it) and then shift. Because you're on manual those settings won't change, you could do it on Av but you'll have to sue the exposure lock button (or keep the shutter button half pressed). Also when meter have the lens pointed approximately where your final shot will be i.e. point the camera up a bit to frame the building, otherwise other stuff in the frame that won't end up in the final photo could affect metering.

Also shift is measured in mm, not degrees ;) .


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TS-E Learning Curve
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