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Thread started 24 Sep 2010 (Friday) 20:01
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Newbie here: What's your everyday go to image quaity setting?

 
gkuenning
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Sep 25, 2010 01:48 |  #16

jase1125 wrote in post #10973482 (external link)
I will answer your question with a question: Do you intend to ever advance your photography abilities? If not, then just stick with JPG large. If you intend to improve and develop your skills then RAW full resolution. With the extra resolution you will be able to crop more. With RAW, you will have more latitude to correct exposure errors while you learn.

It's a bit more complicated than that.

RAW has costs. In particular, it has postprocessing costs. It also takes up storage space and (if you upload pictures across a network) bandwidth.

Some people are happy to spend time postprocessing; others would rather devote that effort to things like studying composition, learning how to light, or spending time with their family. Some people have plenty of disk space with good backups and a fast Internet connection; others are making do with old computers and (even today) dialup lines.

I shoot what I shoot and try not to judge others who make different choices under different circumstances.

BTW, I shoot JPEG, max quality most of the time. I switch to RAW in situations where it makes sense (difficult exposure or ultra-important shots). The time I save on processing RAW files, I spend on other things that are more important to me personally.

And once in a great while, I go all the way down to 800x600 or even 640x480 for specialized situations.


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Anders ­ Östberg
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Sep 25, 2010 04:25 |  #17

gkuenning wrote in post #10974551 (external link)
...
Some people are happy to spend time postprocessing; others would rather devote that effort to things like studying composition, learning how to light, or spending time with their family.
...

These things are by no means mutually exclusive, even if they very often are set up that way in these discussions.

With a simple automated workflow it takes very little extra time to go from raw to JPEG if you don't want to convert images individually. It's just a few clicks and you can go have a coffee with your family while the computer does the job for you. You then still have the option of getting the full benefit of the raw format for those images you feel are worth more effort.


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philwillmedia
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Sep 25, 2010 05:36 |  #18

Everyone is different.
Use what best works for you.
I shoot sport professionally and I don't mind saying I use hi res jpeg, as do the majority of people I shoot with.
I've never had a problem.


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gkuenning
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Sep 25, 2010 05:48 |  #19

Anders Östberg wrote in post #10974840 (external link)
These things are by no means mutually exclusive, even if they very often are set up that way in these discussions.

With a simple automated workflow it takes very little extra time to go from raw to JPEG if you don't want to convert images individually. It's just a few clicks and you can go have a coffee with your family while the computer does the job for you. You then still have the option of getting the full benefit of the raw format for those images you feel are worth more effort.

Clicks? What are these clicks of which you speak?

My point being that what works for one person doesn't necessarily work for everyone. Most people couldn't get even a single picture to show up on my machine, yet I have a (click-free) workflow that goes very smoothly for me. It just doesn't happen to include the use of RAW. (And it's not even necessary to use a RAW converter for most images; usually when I shoot RAW I use RAW+JPEG so the camera does the work for me.)

I'm glad RAW works for other people. But don't make the error of thinking that because something is good for you, it's good for everyone.


Geoff
All I want is a 10-2000 f/0.5L with no distortion that weighs 100 grams, fits in my pocket, and costs $300. Is that too much to ask?

  
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Headshotzx
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Sep 25, 2010 05:51 |  #20

RAW at full res

If I shoot field sports with large sequences, it's Large JPG, unless the sport is slow or action only happens in short bursts, then I shoot in RAW.

if I need to upload quickly and that's it, I shoot Large JPG

if I need to upload quickly, but then go back home to do better editing for my own use, I soot RAW + L


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Sep 25, 2010 05:54 |  #21

guntoter wrote in post #10973678 (external link)
Buy "Understanding Exposure" by Brian Peterson. About $20 on Amazon. You have a great camera. That book will help you become a competant photographer.
Don't forget about your owners manual.
Until the book arrives, you can always use green box setting, but don't be afraid to play with AV, TV, or manual.
Good luck with the new camera and have fun.

Great book, read it starting out.


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Sep 25, 2010 05:57 |  #22

+1 on full size raw, but what does the OP mean buy "everyday" setting. If i'm shooting my kids birthday, I'm usually at Jpeg medium. Don't need to spend time converting or need 21mp images for that.


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Anders ­ Östberg
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Sep 25, 2010 06:06 |  #23

gkuenning wrote in post #10974956 (external link)
...
But don't make the error of thinking that because something is good for you, it's good for everyone.

I don't believe I have ever even remotely claimed something like that. :)

I shoot mostly raw but choose JPEG in some situations too. Just pointing out that there are options, raw needn't be the time and work problem it's sometimes made out to be in these discussions. I frankly don't care what other people do, it's only their loss if they don't investigate the possibilities. You never know, maybe people are missing something good just because they are scared away from it online.


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Sep 25, 2010 06:12 |  #24

Normally I shoot raw which is by default on my cam full size.
If you don't want to do any post processing on the computer except to crop then full size jpeg is the way to go.
If you don't want to post process or crop then medium jpeg would work.
There are really two things to learn with the dslr, camera work and processing on the computer.
I concur with the writer who recommended Peterson's book.


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spear
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Sep 25, 2010 06:29 as a reply to  @ tmcman's post |  #25

With price of memory and storage media today, it really is not a big deal to use RAW+JPEG in all your shots. I mean you can get a 32GB card for around $ 70 (compact flash or SD), and you can get a 1TB HDD for less than $ 60 and a 2 TB HDD for around $ 110. I think unless you shoot a lot of video, you will have a hard time filling up your hard disks even with the relatively large RAW files that come out of a 5DII. Even if you never use the RAW files, it is always nice to know that you have the original output from the camera saved. Software is improving daily and some very old shots that I took in RAW many years back, have allowed even better images than was possible at that time. I just wish I had started taking RAW pictures much earlier on, but to be honest at that time the memory card situation was not the same and memory real estate was quite expensive.


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damnit
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Sep 25, 2010 06:45 |  #26

As others have said, shoot RAW, disk space and memory cards are cheap enough to do it without much concern these days, and over time you will understand why RAW is such a better animal than jpg - you really will kick yourself in future if you don't make this switch now.

Only exception for me is with my motorsport photography where I might take several thousand photos in one weekend ... RAW would be far better for PP, but at around 15-20Mb per RAW image the amount of disc space required per event makes this a bit OTT, so unless there is a special shot I am going for, I generally shoot jpg there and make sure I get it right in the camera ...

(TIP: learn to use your camera's histogram rather than just looking at the LCD to assess whether you are getting correct exposures).


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Sep 25, 2010 06:50 |  #27

EC99SS wrote in post #10973187 (external link)
Hi all -
After much research and the help of some folks here we decided to go with the T2i with kit lens (I also have the 50-250 on its way). I'm a newbie but love learning this! I was wondering what you use as an everyday setting for image quality. I know a lot of you take high quality pictures for the great focus,sharpness etc. I'm trying to strike a balance as I'm not at that level yet.

For fun candid family shots, going to the park, disneyland, etc what quality setting would you use? Right now we wouldn't print anything bigger than an 8x10 and typically stay within your 4x6 and 5x7. Should "medium" be the setting?

Thanks

For me it's always RAW - then post processing.
I cannot loose anything by using RAW (except HDD space).


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Michael1116
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Sep 25, 2010 07:02 |  #28

RAW + full res


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Sep 25, 2010 07:08 |  #29

Raw large unless it's just snapshots or there's a ton of them that don't require extensive post processing. Then I use large fine Jpeg. For example, I'm shooting a 5k race in a few weeks. There's no way I'm shooting them in raw. The post processing would be a death march.

If I ever get one of those > 10 megapixel Canons, I might start adding sRaw to the mix, as there are way too many megapixels than necessary for most non-cropped print and publishing work.

As for Raw+jpeg, I never saw the use for that. I save my post processed raws as jpegs. So then I'd have two sets of jpegs. What's the point?


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InsanelyMarc
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Sep 25, 2010 07:15 |  #30

I just shoot in RAW + JPEG that way I can choose to edit whichever shots I want out of the set and leave the others as is SOOC


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Newbie here: What's your everyday go to image quaity setting?
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