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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EOS Digital Cameras 
Thread started 18 Oct 2010 (Monday) 04:36
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500D on a sunny day

 
ralff
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Oct 19, 2010 05:30 |  #46

neardark wrote in post #11120817 (external link)
Could this be a fault with the camera or even a Firmware issue, after googling it, it seems I am not alone when it comes to this problem with the 500D/T1i.

I think the numbers indicate it is more of an entry level DSLR and beginners tend to have this problem. LEARN to use your histogram, this is the most valuable tool that digital has. I would start shooting raw AND J-Pegs, memory is cheap and you get to play with raw a while and still have the Jpegs. Until you get out of the "creative zones" all you have done is upgraded to a more expensive point n shoot. The defaults on your point and shoot are different than the defaults on the DSLR, if you want to stay with the Jpegs then change the settings in your DSLR until you get the picture style you want, don't expect the defaults on the DSLR to be the same as the point and shoot. You just have to learn to use a new tool, it is NOT just the camera that makes the image, it is also the photographer. Too many people move up thinking that is all it take to make better pictures, NOT.


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neardark
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Oct 19, 2010 06:26 |  #47

ralff wrote in post #11124272 (external link)
I think the numbers indicate it is more of an entry level DSLR and beginners tend to have this problem. LEARN to use your histogram, this is the most valuable tool that digital has. I would start shooting raw AND J-Pegs, memory is cheap and you get to play with raw a while and still have the Jpegs. Until you get out of the "creative zones" all you have done is upgraded to a more expensive point n shoot. The defaults on your point and shoot are different than the defaults on the DSLR, if you want to stay with the Jpegs then change the settings in your DSLR until you get the picture style you want, don't expect the defaults on the DSLR to be the same as the point and shoot. You just have to learn to use a new tool, it is NOT just the camera that makes the image, it is also the photographer. Too many people move up thinking that is all it take to make better pictures, NOT.


Don't get me wrong I can use Manual, I just dont want to change settings for every shot on a dayout, but its looking like I'm going to have to, Was just really gutted about how poor the default setting is.

If a £100 point and shoot and get the Exposure right in AUTO mode, I just assumed my £500 could do it too and do it better.

Oh well......


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Lowner
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Oct 19, 2010 06:46 |  #48

neardark,

It will if thats really all you want from it, just play with the jpeg presets. I don't agree with what you want to do, but hey, its a free world.

I actually "expose to the right" on purpose, then recover my RAW images after the event. As long as the highlights are not blown, it packs more data into the file giving a better final image.


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egordon99
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Oct 19, 2010 07:44 |  #49

neardark wrote in post #11124382 (external link)
Don't get me wrong I can use Manual, I just dont want to change settings for every shot on a dayout, but its looking like I'm going to have to, Was just really gutted about how poor the default setting is.

Well photography is all about having to "change settings" for each shot/scene depending on what you want the photograph to convey.

DSLRs are NOT Point-n-shoots.

If a £100 point and shoot and get the Exposure right in AUTO mode, I just assumed my £500 could do it too and do it better.

Oh well......

But the P&S didn't get the exposure "right" anymore than your DSLR. In the P&S, the trees are VERY dark with little detail. In your shot, they are exposed properly at the expense of the sky. If you KNOW you want the sky properly exposed, then setup the camera to expose the sky properly.

If you're disappointed that you have to "think" to be able to take a proper photograph, than I'm afraid you're in the wrong discipline.




  
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Mundty
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Oct 19, 2010 07:54 |  #50

neardark wrote in post #11123864 (external link)
I have Lightroom, I just shot in JPEG as I did not want to PP over 400 pics.

This doesn't solve the problem that the camera over exposed your shot... but if you select all those photos and hit Auto Tone, it will correct all of them automatically. Granted they may still be a little off, but LR is pretty good and fixing horrendous errors like that.

As far as the exposure, can you post more examples. I just find it hard to believe that all your pictures turned out like that. Like I said I've owned everything from the XS to T2i and never saw this with any of them. I guess it's possible that there's something wrong with your cameras metering, because otherwise I don't see any possible way it could have overexposed every shot. Canon's metering is very intelligent and while a dud can appear here and there, a roll of 400 of them like your posted example seems impossible.

I any case, I hope you find a solution or call Canon and get it figured out.


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egordon99
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Oct 19, 2010 07:58 as a reply to  @ Mundty's post |  #51

But the shot is NOT "overexposed" according to how the camera's metering read the scene. That scene has a HUGE dynamic range and something had to give. Either the sky or the trees.

This is where knowing how to "read the light" in the scene comes in handy.

But like Mike said, hitting "AUTO" in Lightroom (or bringing the exposure slider down a bit) would have easily salvaged that shot.




  
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neardark
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Oct 19, 2010 09:18 |  #52

realmike15 wrote in post #11117963 (external link)
What picture mode were you on? Landscape mode will give you the most Vivid Contrasty colors. Also it depends on where you were metering, as suggested above. Generally P&S tend to do everything for you, where a DSLR is going to make you work a little... this is especially true using any Creative Mode or Manual Mode. Also what brand was your P&S, was it on any specific mode that exaggerates colors/saturation? My friend has a P&S that has many modes that will give a certain Color Hue to every picture, or exaggerate the Color Saturation. Generally DSLR's don't have these modes, because photographers do this in PP in something like Lightroom or Aperture... there's more control there and you still have the original negative instead of an enhanced image straight from the camera.

Was just on the Standard mode.


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neardark
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Oct 19, 2010 09:18 |  #53

realmike15 wrote in post #11124665 (external link)
This doesn't solve the problem that the camera over exposed your shot... but if you select all those photos and hit Auto Tone, it will correct all of them automatically. Granted they may still be a little off, but LR is pretty good and fixing horrendous errors like that.

As far as the exposure, can you post more examples. I just find it hard to believe that all your pictures turned out like that. Like I said I've owned everything from the XS to T2i and never saw this with any of them. I guess it's possible that there's something wrong with your cameras metering, because otherwise I don't see any possible way it could have overexposed every shot. Canon's metering is very intelligent and while a dud can appear here and there, a roll of 400 of them like your posted example seems impossible.

I any case, I hope you find a solution or call Canon and get it figured out.


No not all the images were like that but there was certainly more bad than good, will run them through LR and see how I get on, dont get me wrong I have had some stunning pics from this camera, it's always the exposure that lets me down when out in a sunny day.


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egordon99
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Oct 19, 2010 09:21 as a reply to  @ neardark's post |  #54

Your camera is FINE! It tried to expose the trees. It didn't know that you would rather have the sky properly exposed.




  
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spiralspirit
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Oct 20, 2010 04:54 |  #55

neardark wrote in post #11125030 (external link)
No not all the images were like that but there was certainly more bad than good, will run them through LR and see how I get on, dont get me wrong I have had some stunning pics from this camera, it's always the exposure that lets me down when out in a sunny day.

If you're looking to have sky exposed properly, aim at the sky for metering. If you're looking to have the ground exposed properly, aim at the grass/ground for metering. In scenes with high dynamic range (very bright areas and very dark areas) a sensor cannot get all the detail in every area, and depending on how YOU tell it to meter, it will aim for one or the other.


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Gregg.Siam
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Oct 20, 2010 08:19 as a reply to  @ spiralspirit's post |  #56

I'm lazy and don't want to go through all 4 pages.

1. P&S cameras set color saturation really high.
-you can do this too by creating a custom picture style of 5, 2, 2, 0
-easy to change, just push the bottom circular button (i forgot what they are called)

2. Possibly turn off auto lighting optimizer (alo)
-when I first started to use my 550d, the pics generally seemed over exposed. Once turning off the alo they were on par with what I expected.

3. Enable high tone priority (htp)
-if shooting high contrast like bright skies and dark grounds, enable htp in the menu to help with the high contrasts (iso is limited to 6400, but who really cares)


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chrismid259
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Jan 11, 2011 15:04 |  #57

I've only had my 500D for just under a week now - I have a problem when shoot some grass, sky and houses from the upstairs window of my house the grass seems to be very dark. I have my camera set to evaluative metering. Would it be wise to try a different metering mode such as center-weighted average?


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Jan 11, 2011 15:32 |  #58

chrismid259 wrote in post #11619310 (external link)
I've only had my 500D for just under a week now - I have a problem when shoot some grass, sky and houses from the upstairs window of my house the grass seems to be very dark. I have my camera set to evaluative metering. Would it be wise to try a different metering mode such as center-weighted average?

Post an example?

At a guess I think it might be more a dynamic range problem/exposure issue (underexposed).


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chrismid259
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Jan 11, 2011 15:54 |  #59

I don't have an example to hand at the moment - I will post one tomorrow.
One thing that I suppose could contribute to my problem is the lack of natural daylight in my area at the moment (cloudy), meaning that the garden is constantly in shade. Possible?

Maybe it would be best if I tried taking the same shot when there is a sun visible in the sky.


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DetlevCM
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Jan 11, 2011 15:55 |  #60

chrismid259 wrote in post #11619670 (external link)
I don't have an example to hand at the moment - I will post one tomorrow.
One thing that I suppose could contribute to my problem is the lack of natural daylight in my area at the moment (cloudy), meaning that the garden is constantly in shade. Possible?

My guess if it's cloudy the sky is nearly pure white, hence the camera drops exposure leading to dark grass.
The human eye has a greater dynamic range than a DSRL sensor.


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