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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre General Photography Talk 
Thread started 17 Nov 2010 (Wednesday) 20:54
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Trying to figure out how to shoot in manual...

 
m.d.harper
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Nov 17, 2010 20:54 |  #1

...and not always having the best of luck. I have even gone so far as to take an indoor image on auto and then set the exact same settings in manual only to get a very under exposed outcome in manual. Please help...and thanks.




  
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AdamC
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Nov 17, 2010 20:57 |  #2

In its simplest form, half-press the shutter button, and view where the little needle is at the bottom (as seen through the viewfinder) - it should be in the middle. If not, adjust your shutter speed or f/stop until it is.


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m.d.harper
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Nov 17, 2010 21:12 |  #3

AdamC...thanks for the tip, however I already get how to do that and set the white balance and such but the picture has a bad yellowish tint to it. I then set it to auto and mimiced those settings on manual only to be a very dark image.




  
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AdamC
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Nov 17, 2010 21:16 as a reply to  @ m.d.harper's post |  #4

Depending on your camera, setting it to full auto (green box mode) might result in auto adjustment of ISO as well as shutter and f/stop - this might possibly explain your underexposed images when trying to duplicate the results.

As for the yellow tint - sounds like a simple WB error, which is often easy to do as some lights require compensating for in unexpected ways. Trail and error is your friend. :)


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tonylong
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Nov 17, 2010 22:53 |  #5

m.d.harper wrote in post #11303931 (external link)
AdamC...thanks for the tip, however I already get how to do that and set the white balance and such but the picture has a bad yellowish tint to it. I then set it to auto and mimiced those settings on manual only to be a very dark image.

AdamC wrote in post #11303948 (external link)
Depending on your camera, setting it to full auto (green box mode) might result in auto adjustment of ISO as well as shutter and f/stop - this might possibly explain your underexposed images when trying to duplicate the results.

As for the yellow tint - sounds like a simple WB error, which is often easy to do as some lights require compensating for in unexpected ways. Trail and error is your friend. :)

Yeah -- did you check your ISO with the Auto shot? What were you set to in Manual?


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PhotosGuy
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Nov 18, 2010 07:48 |  #6

AdamC wrote in post #11303858 (external link)
In its simplest form, half-press the shutter button, and view where the little needle is at the bottom (as seen through the viewfinder) - it should be in the middle. If not, adjust your shutter speed or f/stop until it is.

That's the same as shooting in manual with an Auto exposure, & will only work if you were pointing it at something near 12-18% gray. This works better for me: Need an exposure crutch?


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m.d.harper
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Nov 18, 2010 15:52 |  #7

Photos guy...thanks for the good technique. It has helped!




  
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4Bucks
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Nov 19, 2010 14:40 |  #8

Read the link in my sig.
I am completely self taught from this website and the link was a huge help for me.
Good Luck.


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sandpiper
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Nov 19, 2010 14:48 |  #9

AdamC wrote in post #11303858 (external link)
In its simplest form, half-press the shutter button, and view where the little needle is at the bottom (as seen through the viewfinder) - it should be in the middle. If not, adjust your shutter speed or f/stop until it is.

If all you are doing is trying to put the needle in the middle, then you might as well shoot in Av, Tv etc. and save yourself having to fiddle around with settings so much.

With the needle centred, you are simply accepting the cameras metering and it will choose exactly the same exposure in the auto modes. The idea of manual is to let you overide the cameras decision and choose the exposure for yourself, correcting for scenes which will throw the metering off.

The 'correct' exposure is possibly a couple of stops or more to the left or right of centre on that needle.




  
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Wilt
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Nov 20, 2010 16:27 |  #10

m.d.harper wrote in post #11303850 (external link)
...and not always having the best of luck. I have even gone so far as to take an indoor image on auto and then set the exact same settings in manual only to get a very under exposed outcome in manual. Please help...and thanks.

If you had put your camera on a tripod, so that its view is constant and fixed, then setting the camera on Manual and mimicing exactly what the camera settings had shown for aperture and shutter speed (while in Av or Tv) should produce exactly the same exposure! Av simply sets the shutter to correlate to the aperture which you preselected, for example, so if you had set Av and chosen f/8 and the meter had then chosen 1/400, the exposure would look exactly like you having camera in M with f/8 and 1/400 manually chosen by you!

If a shot was quite underexposed in M, then setting the camera on Av or Tv would have resulted in a similarly underexposed shot.

Shooting in Manual is merely you controlling BOTH shutter speed and aperture, while Tv or Av is letting the camera choose one and you choose the other parameter. No difference in exposure should result from merely choice of mode!

A fundamental understanding that people need to have about ANY reflected light metering (which is what your camera does), is that it assumes the thing that is metered will average to 18% gray mid-tone value.

  • If you aim at bride in white gown on a snowy background, the meter tries to turn her and the snow into 18% gray...which is why you need to use EC + while in Av or Tv mode.
  • If you aim at a black minister in a black minister's shirt in front of a black background, the meter tries to turn him and the background into 18% gray...which is why you need to use EC - while in Av or Tv mode.

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egordon99
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Nov 20, 2010 19:20 |  #11

m.d.harper wrote in post #11303850 (external link)
...and not always having the best of luck. I have even gone so far as to take an indoor image on auto and then set the exact same settings in manual only to get a very under exposed outcome in manual. Please help...and thanks.

I bet the flash is popping up in AUTO. Are you also popping up the flash in M?




  
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Agent ­ 655
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Nov 21, 2010 12:34 |  #12

Also if you are going to M use RAW images. That way you can worry less about the white balance and more on the exposure.




  
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nate42nd
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Nov 21, 2010 18:36 |  #13

I am a long time photographer switching over to M. I have used AV for a long time, but M is going to open up some more options for me. Thanks for the links. Especially this one.

https://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthre​ad.php?t=89123


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Trying to figure out how to shoot in manual...
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