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FORUMS General Gear Talk Flash and Studio Lighting 
Thread started 09 Dec 2010 (Thursday) 01:15
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Using a single strobe (NOT hotshoe flash)- creative examples - mark II

 
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JakAHearts
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Oct 23, 2012 18:12 |  #7966

Haha. I set my phone last session with a reminder. Take a few setup shots NOW! :) I still didn't do it.


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Yohan ­ Pamudji
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Oct 23, 2012 22:20 |  #7967

patliean1 wrote in post #15160338 (external link)
I had about 45 seconds to set this shot up....and i spent 15 of those seconds shooting the BTS pic ha

If you only had 45 seconds how did you set flash power and exposure? Trial and error? Massive amounts of experience? Both? :)




  
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patliean1
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Oct 23, 2012 23:27 |  #7968

Yohan Pamudji wrote in post #15161504 (external link)
If you only had 45 seconds how did you set flash power and exposure? Trial and error? Massive amounts of experience? Both? :)

To be perfectly honest it's experience (also known as repetition). At most I have to chimp maybe 2 shots before I get the correct exposure and after a while I began to understand at about what flash power and distance from subject to give me the results I want rather quickly :D


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328iGuy
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Oct 24, 2012 06:55 |  #7969

Yohan Pamudji wrote in post #15161504 (external link)
If you only had 45 seconds how did you set flash power and exposure? Trial and error? Massive amounts of experience? Both? :)

Meter?


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Mark1
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Oct 24, 2012 09:29 |  #7970

patliean1 wrote in post #15161753 (external link)
To be perfectly honest it's experience (also known as repetition). At most I have to chimp maybe 2 shots before I get the correct exposure and after a while I began to understand at about what flash power and distance from subject to give me the results I want rather quickly :D

This is a good thing to know even for beginners or people that rarely shoot.

A flash at a given power setting through the same umbrella will always be the same. So every time you use the same power setting, with the same umbrella, at the same distance... your aperture will always be the same. Unless you are going for a different look that is... But it will be more consistent than you will be.

So before you even pack your gear the day before... You already know if you need a specific power setting through a specific umbrella. and are able to set it a given distance.... you already know what aperture you will need. The only variable you dont know is how reflective the clothing will be. And that will require the bit of chimping.


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Terry_Hill
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Oct 24, 2012 09:32 |  #7971

noelty wrote in post #15158218 (external link)
580EX II @ full power shot through gridded Cheetah Qbox 24

IMAGE NOT FOUND
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

Julie & Presley (external link) by noeltykay (external link), on Flickr

I can't help being drawn to the fact the mothers far cheek makes it look like she has a big lump in her nose. Think either more or less angle would have got rid of it but it's still a lovely shot.


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Yohan ­ Pamudji
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Oct 24, 2012 10:12 |  #7972

patliean1 wrote in post #15161753 (external link)
To be perfectly honest it's experience (also known as repetition). At most I have to chimp maybe 2 shots before I get the correct exposure and after a while I began to understand at about what flash power and distance from subject to give me the results I want rather quickly :D

Figures--no easy way to the top :)

Mark1 wrote in post #15162919 (external link)
This is a good thing to know even for beginners or people that rarely shoot.

A flash at a given power setting through the same umbrella will always be the same. So every time you use the same power setting, with the same umbrella, at the same distance... your aperture will always be the same. Unless you are going for a different look that is... But it will be more consistent than you will be.

So before you even pack your gear the day before... You already know if you need a specific power setting through a specific umbrella. and are able to set it a given distance.... you already know what aperture you will need. The only variable you dont know is how reflective the clothing will be. And that will require the bit of chimping.

This works if you're ignoring/overpowering ambient, but if you want to bring in some of the environment that's another factor to figure in, right? That's the kind of situation I'm usually in and how patliean1's shot is. So using the method of memorizing a particular aperture/ISO/distance/​power combo I guess the workflow would look something like this:

1. Say you memorize f/4, ISO 400, 10ft., 1/2 power (probably wildly off, but bear with me :)) as a combo that produces accurate flash exposure.
2. Set f/4 and ISO 400 in aperture priority and use the camera's meter to figure out shutter speed for ambient balance.

Or alternatively you could have so much practice doing it that you know within 2 test shots what the exposure should be a la patliean1 :D

When setting the shutter speed if you wander off into high speed sync shutter speeds does that change the power calculation? Say you can use 1/2 power when you're under the sync speed limit. If you're over does that mean you have to crank the power due to power loss from high speed sync? Another factor to consider if so although not a factor in patliean1's shot since the lower ambient level means you're not having to overpower it.

In any case this gives me inspiration to try this method. Typically in rushed situations I've resorted to E-TTL and a few test shots, but this gives me another method to consider. Thanks, guys.




  
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JakAHearts
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Oct 24, 2012 11:42 |  #7973

Yohan Pamudji wrote in post #15163115 (external link)
Figures--no easy way to the top :)

See below. It wont get you to the top but it is easy. :lol:

328iGuy wrote in post #15162488 (external link)
Meter?


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Yohan ­ Pamudji
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Oct 24, 2012 12:19 |  #7974

JakAHearts wrote in post #15163519 (external link)
See below. It wont get you to the top but it is easy. :lol:

I do use a meter when I have more time but I've found it slows me down when I'm in a hurry. Maybe I just need to get more proficient at using it ;)




  
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Mark1
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Oct 24, 2012 12:58 |  #7975

Yohan Pamudji wrote in post #15163115 (external link)
When setting the shutter speed if you wander off into high speed sync shutter speeds does that change the power calculation? Say you can use 1/2 power when you're under the sync speed limit. If you're over does that mean you have to crank the power due to power loss from high speed sync? Another factor to consider if so although not a factor in patliean1's shot since the lower ambient level means you're not having to overpower it.

Power loss is really only a problem when you have to HSS at full power. At any other setting there is reserve power in the unit to make up what is needed to get HSS. In other words if you have to HSS at half power. You still have half of the power available to be used. If it didnt tap into this to maintain proper exposure, HSS would be way to unpredictable to be of any use. But at full power there is no reserve to tap into so you start to get problems with loss of power.

Yohan Pamudji wrote in post #15163115 (external link)
This works if you're ignoring/overpowering ambient, but if you want to bring in some of the environment that's another factor to figure in, right? That's the kind of situation I'm usually in and how patliean1's shot is. So using the method of memorizing a particular aperture/ISO/distance/​power combo I guess the workflow would look something like this:

1. Say you memorize f/4, ISO 400, 10ft., 1/2 power (probably wildly off, but bear with me :)) as a combo that produces accurate flash exposure.
2. Set f/4 and ISO 400 in aperture priority and use the camera's meter to figure out shutter speed for ambient balance.

Or alternatively you could have so much practice doing it that you know within 2 test shots what the exposure should be a la patliean1 :D

Its not really ignoreing it. It is more of a side note. After shooting a few shots before you even start the event, you will know where the ambient is at. Then the decision when setting up a shot, is do you want to ballence the ambient or over power it? So say the ambient is at your example of f4. You know if you set the flash of at half power 10 feet from the subject at iso 400 you will get a good ballence. But if you want to over power the ambient you only have one stop left in the flash before you need to bring it closer. Keep in mind....It takes about 20X times longer to type/read this as it does is your head while working.

When ever a flash/strobe is involved I ONLY use manual. In a controlled enviroment aV might work fine. But you never know on location. Tiny things in the background can make the camera change somewhat drasticaly at times. A few percentage points more or less of a window being in frame can mean a stop or 2 to the camera. But means nothing to you. so your backgrounds will not be consistant. If your are in manual. You can go from all to none of the window in the frame and end up with the exact same exposure ballence.

We can go on and on.. I would say lets start a new thread on ballencing the light if you want to. And let this turn back into the thread it is meant to be.


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Oct 24, 2012 13:04 |  #7976

Nowhere near as serious as most of the stuff in here but the very start of a little fun winter project with the kids!!

The 1976 vs 2005 Project ~ Photos 1 & 2 :)

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'The Drinkers' (external link) by Lee|Ratters (external link), on Flickr

IMAGE: http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8464/8119714313_4c802d9097_z.jpg
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patliean1
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Oct 24, 2012 13:10 |  #7977

Light meters are an excellent tool to get an understanding of what your lights are doing. Once you get experience in various ambient lighting situations you begin to know at what starting point your flash/strobe power should be at based on distance from subject.

The issue with light meters is they can't make a creative decision for you. That is up to the photographer


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www.vimeo.com/25753524 (external link) <------Behind the scenes video of my photoshoots! (Featured on FStoppers)

  
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Yohan ­ Pamudji
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Oct 24, 2012 14:34 |  #7978

Sorry for the distraction, guys. Great pointers, and keep up the inspirational work.




  
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JakAHearts
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Oct 24, 2012 14:39 |  #7979

No need for an apology, Yohan. Make a thread about it. Its a good topic. :D My opinion varies from Pat's. A light meter enhances my creativity. :D


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RSMarco
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Oct 24, 2012 15:22 |  #7980

noelty wrote in post #15158218 (external link)
580EX II @ full power shot through gridded Cheetah Qbox 24

IMAGE NOT FOUND
HTTP response: NOT FOUND | MIME changed to 'image/gif' | Redirected to error image by FLICKR

Julie & Presley (external link) by noeltykay (external link), on Flickr

Really nice result. Love it! Well done and thanks for sharing!


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