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FORUMS Photography Talk by Genre Nature & Landscapes Talk 
Thread started 15 Dec 2010 (Wednesday) 08:11
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Impressionist Photography

 
JPBones73
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Dec 15, 2010 08:11 |  #1

I wasn't sure if I should post this here or in the 'experimental' category, but I did a new blog post documenting my attempts at Impressionist photography. I received some great feedback from forum members on my 'Shooting Birds' tutorial, which is still up. Thanks for looking.

http://jpmphillyphoto.​blogspot.com …ssionist-photography.html (external link)


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sapearl
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Dec 15, 2010 08:38 |  #2

Hello JP - and how did you know that Albert Bierstadt is one of my favorite American painters of the old West, as well as other venues? :D

His talent was unmatched at the time, IMO, in his attempt to convey the aspect of the trek west in the 1800's, walking the Oregon Trail, and simply enjoying the vistas of this great country. I have the good fortune of living not too far from Youngstown, Ohio, home of the Butler Institute of American Art, which has on display Church's work as well as Bierstadt's Oregon Trail masterpiece:

http://artmight.com …1902/The-Oregon-Trail.jpg (external link)

It is quite magnificent to see the original hanging mere inches in front of you in their main gallery. In my own work I have attempted to capture this sort of light with captures like this:

http://www.pbase.com/s​apearl/image/119461520 (external link)

and this one:

http://www.pbase.com/s​apearl/image/94899345 (external link)

But my efforts in no way can measure up to those of these master painters.


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airfrogusmc
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Dec 15, 2010 08:48 as a reply to  @ sapearl's post |  #3

But we are photographers and not painters? This argument is 100 + years old. When photography was a mere infant it tried to mimic the paintings of the day which in the mid to late 1880s was impressionism. It even had a name, pictorial photography. It was not taken very seriously by anyone at the time because it was trying to imitate another art form. For photography to be taken seriously and for it to come into its own it needed what was called the straight photography movement which took all the elements of what photography does that no other art form can do. Thus photography started being taken seriously because it was no longer an imitation. I love the impressionist movement and the work that came from it too. Just not photographs that imitate it. I hear folks say oooohhhh my that looks just like a painting when looking at a photograph; I take it as an insult not praise.




  
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JPBones73
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Dec 15, 2010 13:08 |  #4

sapearl,

I took a class on American Art in college and wasn't expecting much, especially since it starts with Colonial portraiture. The 19th Century landscape painters were awe-inspiring. When you see Heart of the Andes at the Met and see how massive and detailed it actually is, it's really something to behold. I've been told that the painting is so detailed that botanists were able to identify many specific species of plants from the painting.

Nice photos by the way. There was a guy at the turn of the century who chiefly painted machines, although his name escapes me.

airfrogusmc,

I hear your point. It's not for everybody. I just like to experiment.


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sapearl
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Dec 15, 2010 13:38 |  #5

JPBones73 wrote in post #11457582 (external link)
sapearl,

I took a class on American Art in college and wasn't expecting much, especially since it starts with Colonial portraiture. The 19th Century landscape painters were awe-inspiring. When you see Heart of the Andes at the Met and see how massive and detailed it actually is, it's really something to behold. I've been told that the painting is so detailed that botanists were able to identify many specific species of plants from the painting.

Nice photos by the way. There was a guy at the turn of the century who chiefly painted machines, although his name escapes me.

airfrogusmc,

I hear your point. It's not for everybody. I just like to experiment.

JP - thank you for the kind words on my photos... much appreciated. I wouldn't deny being a praise whore :lol:.

I never took any formal art history classes myself although the thought of doing so if it was offered nearby is appealing. We have the fantastic Cleveland Museum of Art only a few miles from my home, and its a place I need to visit more often.

The 19th century landscape work grabs my interest also, although I'm not much for floral subjects and much of the subjects that predate that century for some reason. I'm not wild about much of portraiture but I'll make an exception for Sargent's work ;). But my father was an artist and art teacher for much of his life, and I'm sure that his "urban industrial" had more than a subtle impact on my work:

http://pearlphoto.blog​spot.com …ite-flats-and-my-dad.html (external link)

I like your yellow flowers effort with it's partial sworls reminiscient of some Van Gogh work. Part of the image make you wonder, but then there are very obvious cues lower down. I'm not sure about your Leamings Gardens shots. There is certainly some potential there..... but....I guess I don't like the diagonal smear look of it. The shot of the floral closeup (?) of bushes - if you backed off a bit on the effect, gave it back a bit more "reality" and added some sharpenning, perhaps that would enhance it IMHO.

I see the Monet effect you are trying to achieve. While certainly not photo realistic, his dabs and brush strokes are quite distinct and sharp. I believe that's what imparts his strength. - Stu


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JPBones73
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Dec 15, 2010 16:19 |  #6

I actually agree with you on the Leaming's Run pics. I just wanted to throw something up there for discussion aside from two flower pics. Subtle is usually better, or the stuff can make you dizzy.

Make sure you go see Twilight in the Wilderness at the Cleveland Museum.


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airfrogusmc
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Dec 15, 2010 16:32 |  #7

sapearl wrote in post #11456016 (external link)
Hello JP - and how did you know that Albert Bierstadt is one of my favorite American painters of the old West, as well as other venues? :D

His talent was unmatched at the time, IMO, in his attempt to convey the aspect of the trek west in the 1800's, walking the Oregon Trail, and simply enjoying the vistas of this great country. I have the good fortune of living not too far from Youngstown, Ohio, home of the Butler Institute of American Art, which has on display Church's work as well as Bierstadt's Oregon Trail masterpiece:

http://artmight.com …1902/The-Oregon-Trail.jpg (external link)

It is quite magnificent to see the original hanging mere inches in front of you in their main gallery. In my own work I have attempted to capture this sort of light with captures like this:

http://www.pbase.com/s​apearl/image/119461520 (external link)

and this one:

http://www.pbase.com/s​apearl/image/94899345 (external link)

But my efforts in no way can measure up to those of these master painters.

I think your work is very photographic in nature and I would say they measure up fine as photographs. ;)




  
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sapearl
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Dec 15, 2010 20:57 |  #8

Thank you Allen - always good to see you. I'd like to get out there some more in this nice winter light, but unfortunately have had a few temporary setbacks.


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airfrogusmc
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Dec 15, 2010 21:27 |  #9

sapearl wrote in post #11460075 (external link)
Thank you Allen - always good to see you. I'd like to get out there some more in this nice winter light, but unfortunately have had a few temporary setbacks.

Always love looking at your work. You certainly have done a great job capturing Cleveland. Hope the setbacks are out of the way VERY SOON.




  
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stayhumble
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Dec 19, 2010 10:45 |  #10
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creativity has no rules. you must do you.

with that said, i think the final flower shot is beautiful artistically. the rest of the images really seems like only horrible camera shake to me.

but keep work on them and soon theyll all be great! keep it up


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tonyniev
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Dec 19, 2010 11:41 |  #11

I paint watercolor and oil and like the impressionist style. Used to spend hours at NYC Met museum studying at the impressionists hall. Been to Monet's Giverny home, stayed a few days drinking at same bar Van Gogh and Gaugin drank in Arles. I also love to shoot ladnscapes and flowers.

Thanks for posting this and slow speed with my long lenses would blur the subjects enough to create impressionist effect.


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