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FORUMS Canon Cameras, Lenses & Accessories Canon EF and EF-S Lenses 
Thread started 16 Dec 2010 (Thursday) 15:21
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24-70 or 24-105 for indoor flash

 
JeffreyG
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Dec 17, 2010 05:18 |  #31

The shots I showed, where I am 'dragging the shutter' are a combination of both flash exposure and ambient exposure. Because the background is exposed by ambient, the maximum aperture can be important to the shot. That's really all I am saying.

Some people in this thread were implying that if you are using flash then the aperture only matters for DOF. I felt in necessary to point out that aperture can also be important for blended exposures.

I will also cheerfully admit that blended exposure (flash + ambient) reduces demand for fast lenses. For one thing, you can get away with pretty slow shutter speeds. The flash will freeze the subjects (so long as they are not moving really fast) and the background is OOF anyway. Second, you must underexpose the subject/background by at least one stop so that the flash is more than just fill. This again reduces the needed exposure.

Back to my examples - I shot this ISO1600, f/4 and 1/25 and the ambient is underexposed by 1 and 1/3 stops.

To shoot this without flash I would have wanted a shutter speed of 1/125, so I need to find a total of 3 and 2/3 stops more light between the aperture and the ISO to both increase the shutter speed and also have the correct exposure.

So that's ISO3200, 1/125 and f/1.6

And of course, that shot at the table would never have worked at f/1.6.

So what am I concluding.....apertur​e sometimes matters with flash, but less than when shooting ambient. And combining ambient and flash can really let you get away with slower apertures (gain DOF when needed) in low light.


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TooManyShots
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Dec 17, 2010 09:57 |  #32
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xarqi wrote in post #11466988 (external link)
:shock: News to me - what's the physical basis for that? I'd have thought the longer the better, as photon noise would average out over a longer period.


Try it, shoot a scene at 1/3s versus 1/100s. You would either get some burn light or burn pixel from the sensor....


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xarqi
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Dec 17, 2010 15:14 |  #33

JeffreyG wrote in post #11467814 (external link)
The shots I showed, where I am 'dragging the shutter' are a combination of both flash exposure and ambient exposure. Because the background is exposed by ambient, the maximum aperture can be important to the shot. That's really all I am saying.

This clarifies the situation well. Here, a faster lens is not an advantage because flash is being used, but because the ambient light is low. Coincidentally, because ambient light is low, flash may also offer a separate advantage.

I'm back to seeing no real connection between flash and lens speed (except in the limiting case).

TooManyShots wrote in post #11468767 (external link)
Try it, shoot a scene at 1/3s versus 1/100s. You would either get some burn light or burn pixel from the sensor....

I'll give that a go sometime.




  
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thesupe87
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Dec 24, 2010 12:12 |  #34

What about shooting high key - over a blown out white background. Which lens has more CA? 24-70 or 24-105? I can't deal with editing purple fringing out of studio portraits, or product shots - it's annoying as anything and the post production slows me down. That's why I don't shoot with my 50 f1.8 - usually I stick to my 70-200 f4, but the amount of backspace I need to shoot is annoying. My 18-55 IS even is pretty good, very low CA that's easy to correct with a quick slider adjustment in Lightroom.


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TooManyShots
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Dec 24, 2010 12:59 |  #35
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thesupe87 wrote in post #11508522 (external link)
What about shooting high key - over a blown out white background. Which lens has more CA? 24-70 or 24-105? I can't deal with editing purple fringing out of studio portraits, or product shots - it's annoying as anything and the post production slows me down. That's why I don't shoot with my 50 f1.8 - usually I stick to my 70-200 f4, but the amount of backspace I need to shoot is annoying. My 18-55 IS even is pretty good, very low CA that's easy to correct with a quick slider adjustment in Lightroom.


With a white background, I believe in general you light them up separately....:) You independently expose the white background and the subject.


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24-70 or 24-105 for indoor flash
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