Approve the Cookies
This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and our Privacy Policy.
OK
Index  •   • New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Guest
New posts  •   • RTAT  •   • 'Best of'  •   • Gallery  •   • Gear  •   • Reviews
Register to forums    Log in

 
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing 
Thread started 27 Dec 2010 (Monday) 13:56
Search threadPrev/next
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

Camera Guy Career

 
HastyPhoto
Senior Member
Avatar
953 posts
Joined Oct 2009
Location: Philly Burbs
     
Dec 27, 2010 13:56 |  #1

I'm thinking about going back to school, anyone know anything about those jobs you see like for example, the camera guys for the weather channel or news channels. How to go about it? Schooling etc?

Thanks.


60D | EFS 17-55 2.8 IS | Rode VideoMic Pro | Manfrotto 190XPROB

www.HastyPhoto.com (external link)
www.etsy.com/shop/Hast​yPhoto (external link)
www.facebook.com/HastyPhoto (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)
AxxisPhoto
Goldmember
Avatar
1,893 posts
Gallery: 33 photos
Likes: 64
Joined Dec 2008
Location: Chicago, IL
     
Dec 27, 2010 15:08 |  #2

I've been thinking the same thing. Try an art or trade school. They should have courses in videography and/or camera operation.


Web: Erotiklab (external link)(NSFW)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bensley
Member
34 posts
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Fayetteville, AR
     
Dec 27, 2010 18:06 |  #3

I'm going on my 6th year in TV news. The guys at my station in Indy either have a 4 year degree through a Telecommunications/Jou​rnalism school doing TV Studio/Field Production, Non-linear editing... But a handful have also gone through a 2-year program at a school like Vincennes (external link)here in Indiana.

Ultimately, I think most places are looking for experience. If you can produce a tape showing your skillset and you can do daily turns at a station, you'll probably be good to go. It is like a lot of things, you may have to work your way up the market chain, even if you aren't on-air talent. Expect starting out somewhere smaller, for your case, like in Erie, PA T.V. market - before making it to Philly.

P.S. The pay sucks. Bad. But it can be a lot of fun.


40D Gripped - 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 | 50mm f/1.8 | 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6
Sony XDCAM (external link) | Canon KH 16ex5.7 IRSE (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
aroundlsu
Goldmember
Avatar
1,430 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 9
Joined Mar 2009
     
Dec 28, 2010 00:12 |  #4

I would recommend starting out in feature films. The pay is MUCH better than television and the unions will protect you and even provide health care and pensions. For comparison, a feature film camera operator can easily make $200k/year working 6 months out of the year. A television camera operator will be lucky to make $25k/year working his butt off. If you have no experience you can start off as a 2nd AC (the clapper) and still make WAY more money than a senior TV camera operator.

Check out www.cameraguild.com (external link).

I am a Local 600 feature film camera operator that started in television. No degree necessary. Just enthusiasm and a little luck maybe.


Teddy Smith, SOC
IATSE Local 600 Cinematographer

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
J_Nicholas
Member
Avatar
122 posts
Joined Feb 2009
Location: Las Vegas, NV
     
Dec 28, 2010 00:19 |  #5

That is pretty encouraging. Just curious how old you were when you made your entrance into that job?

aroundlsu wrote in post #11526210 (external link)
I would recommend starting out in feature films. The pay is MUCH better than television and the unions will protect you and even provide health care and pensions. For comparison, a feature film camera operator can easily make $200k/year working 6 months out of the year. A television camera operator will be lucky to make $25k/year working his butt off. If you have no experience you can start off as a 2nd AC (the clapper) and still make WAY more money than a senior TV camera operator.

Check out www.cameraguild.com (external link).

I am a Local 600 feature film camera operator that started in television. No degree necessary. Just enthusiasm and a little luck maybe.


Canon 40D, 7D, EOS3, 24-70 2.8L, 70-200 2.8L, 50mm 1.8, 85mm 1.8

http://www.jnicholasph​otography.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
HastyPhoto
THREAD ­ STARTER
Senior Member
Avatar
953 posts
Joined Oct 2009
Location: Philly Burbs
     
Dec 28, 2010 07:52 |  #6

aroundlsu wrote in post #11526210 (external link)
I would recommend starting out in feature films. The pay is MUCH better than television and the unions will protect you and even provide health care and pensions. For comparison, a feature film camera operator can easily make $200k/year working 6 months out of the year. A television camera operator will be lucky to make $25k/year working his butt off. If you have no experience you can start off as a 2nd AC (the clapper) and still make WAY more money than a senior TV camera operator.

Check out www.cameraguild.com (external link).

I am a Local 600 feature film camera operator that started in television. No degree necessary. Just enthusiasm and a little luck maybe.

That sounds too good to be true, and for me with no experience I dont stand a chance in hell most likely. I've been paying dues for 20 years in the construction trades, been laid off for 2 years now so I'm about done with it all. While my package rate is over $70 an hour that dont mean squat if your not working.


60D | EFS 17-55 2.8 IS | Rode VideoMic Pro | Manfrotto 190XPROB

www.HastyPhoto.com (external link)
www.etsy.com/shop/Hast​yPhoto (external link)
www.facebook.com/HastyPhoto (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Brian_R
Goldmember
2,656 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Aug 2010
     
Dec 28, 2010 08:31 |  #7

do you want to specifically be a camera operator? i am one for my local tv station GPB and work with other people my age range (22) that are still in school and are also cameramen and we do highschool sports. i have tons of experience but not degree in video and film production and no demo reel. didnt have too much trouble becoming a permanent member of the crew after first day when they saw what i could do and my vast knowledge of video and cameras. i started as a volunteer before they decided they wanted me to be at every shoot they do.

other than going back to school you can do it the hard way... volunteer as a camera operator with a local tv station and build up a solid resume of experience and that can help land a job that pays better than the $60 we get per game which is only once a week.

As far as working on feature films. that is too good to be true. you will not be able to do that much less join a union... you have to join for them to protect your job. and you simply have to know the right people experience does not always help you land a feature film job. in hollywood its not about your resume as much how many times does your name show up on IMDB. working on feature films sets takes hard work and extreme dedication and a degree from a known film school NYU, UCLA, SCAD (up and coming film school here in GA). also on a feature film set depending on on the film some camera operators are able to even make close to $10k a day for a beginner cameraman (according to my film teacher who was still working in the industry at the time)




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
squiLL
Senior Member
Avatar
667 posts
Likes: 19
Joined Nov 2009
Location: Long Island, NY
     
Dec 28, 2010 09:27 |  #8

you guys make it sound like its so easy to become a camera op on films/tv/news...

it is probably one of the hardest jobs to get. If you can get a camera op job straight out of film school then you either have connections/your in a small market area/or just got lucky. Every camera op that I know has worked their way up from being a grip/PA/2nd AC/1st AC in their lifetime. Especially here in NY, I don't know a camera op that is under 40 and doesn't have atleast 20 years in the field.

I was a videographer for a company in NC, because I could not get a job in NY and I have a pretty good reel and went to a top NY film school. My best advice is work on a few indies, work for free, build your reel up.. get noticed.. Then start applying to bigger jobs. No one is going to care about you straight out of film school.. You need real work in the field before people even start to look at you.


Mike Cassara
Marketing Manager - Tiffen Filters

Tiffen.com (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
Brian_R
Goldmember
2,656 posts
Likes: 6
Joined Aug 2010
     
Dec 28, 2010 11:42 |  #9

good networking skills helps thats why it was so easy for me. i do not know any important industry people but i know lots of crews and just got a solid referral to do sports which was new to me but easy to adjust to




  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
aroundlsu
Goldmember
Avatar
1,430 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 9
Joined Mar 2009
     
Dec 28, 2010 11:44 |  #10

I don't work in Hollywood. I work way down south in Louisiana. I shot six feature films this year as either stills, camera operator, or second unit dp (or all of the above). My next job is Director of Photography on a $5m feature called Go Go Girls of the Apocalypse, based on the book.

Stills and camera op are the same job as far as the union is concerned with the same pay rate. It's very easy to get started in movies down here. There are more jobs then there are people. My first day on a film set the union rep came and practically begged me to join. They offered all kinds of deals on the initiation fee but I kept putting it off until they recently came and offered to let me join totally free. So I couldn't really pass that up.

Many movies are moving out of Hollywood and into states that offer incentives like Louisiana. Check with your local film commission and submit resumes and portfolios to any production in town. If you can operate a 5D then GREAT mention that loudly. All the recent movies I have worked on are using the 5d for inserts and stunt shots and there is no one on set who knows how to work it except me. I have brought in a few other friends of mine who know how to use the 5D. They have absolutely zero video/film/tv experience yet they have now become - literally overnight - union feature film camera operators.

For what it's worth, the only people I meet on film sets who went to film school are the interns and PAs.


Teddy Smith, SOC
IATSE Local 600 Cinematographer

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
aroundlsu
Goldmember
Avatar
1,430 posts
Gallery: 2 photos
Likes: 9
Joined Mar 2009
     
Dec 28, 2010 11:54 |  #11

To add more inspiration to anyone with a positive attitude..

I got started by just sending out a stills portfolio to a movie I saw coming into town called Blood is Blood starring Sid Haig (House of 1000 Corpses). I thought he was really cool and really wanted to meet him so I submitted the port, got an interview, and got the job as stills. Little did I know stills and camera op are exactly the same thing on a union show (I didn't even know what a union show was at the time). From there, I kept getting more calls from other movies because they get tax breaks when they hire local crew and save lots of money when hiring local as well since they don't have to pay per diem, travel, hotel, etc.

From there, I started showing everyone how great the 5D shoots and started getting offers to operate the 5D on specialty shots. Then I got an offer to second unit DP transition shots for a movie. Then another offer to shoot an entire movie opening sequence with the 5D... No one ever asked me where I went to school (no where) or what my experience was in movies (none). You just have to have a positive attitude and tell everyone what you can do. Don't sit around and wait for nothing to happen.

Oh, then I made that little Six Flags video and my world blew up overnight and I got the offer to DP Go Go Girls of the Apocalypse. That's been my year.


Teddy Smith, SOC
IATSE Local 600 Cinematographer

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
bensley
Member
34 posts
Joined Dec 2010
Location: Fayetteville, AR
     
Jan 01, 2011 13:37 |  #12

Aside from film and long-format media, if you're looking to get into TV - stations are only going to be interested that you have the knowledge and skillsets to get the job done. They'll all obviously ask for experience, but if you can produce a resume tape that proves to them you have what it takes, that could easily over-ride not having previous experience. Go out and enterprise feature/human interest stories in your community and edit them on your own. Aim at putting together concise, stand-alone stories that run from about 1-minute 30-seconds to 3-minutes.

Also, think about using your still photography experience and think about going into print. Even big market papers shoot stories, like the Indianapolis paper (external link) shoots "video" stories now.

For inspiration, I'm a member of the NPPA (external link)- watch some of these stories (external link) to see how the better photogs in the business do things on a daily basis.


40D Gripped - 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 | 50mm f/1.8 | 28-135mm f/3.5-5.6
Sony XDCAM (external link) | Canon KH 16ex5.7 IRSE (external link)

  
  LOG IN TO REPLY
sponsored links
(this ad will go away when you log in as a registered member)

2,151 views & 0 likes for this thread
Camera Guy Career
FORUMS Post Processing, Marketing & Presenting Photos Video and Sound Editing 
AAA
x 1600
y 1600

Jump to forum...   •  Rules   •  Index   •  New posts   •  RTAT   •  'Best of'   •  Gallery   •  Gear   •  Reviews   •  Member list   •  Polls   •  Image rules   •  Search   •  Password reset

Not a member yet?
Register to forums
Registered members may log in to forums and access all the features: full search, image upload, follow forums, own gear list and ratings, likes, more forums, private messaging, thread follow, notifications, own gallery, all settings, view hosted photos, own reviews, see more and do more... and all is free. Don't be a stranger - register now and start posting!


COOKIES DISCLAIMER: This website uses cookies to improve your user experience. By using this site, you agree to our use of cookies and to our privacy policy.
Privacy policy and cookie usage info.


POWERED BY AMASS forum software 2.1forum software
version 2.1 /
code and design
by Pekka Saarinen ©
for photography-on-the.net

Latest registered member is Slowerhand
811 guests, 225 members online
Simultaneous users record so far is 15144, that happened on Nov 22, 2018

Photography-on-the.net Digital Photography Forums is the website for photographers and all who love great photos, camera and post processing techniques, gear talk, discussion and sharing. Professionals, hobbyists, newbies and those who don't even own a camera -- all are welcome regardless of skill, favourite brand, gear, gender or age. Registering and usage is free.